Oenothera biennis / Common Evening Primrose / Seeds

(Code: B&T_167)

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Oenothera biennis / Common Evening Primrose / Seeds

A lovely lemon-scented plant for an informal, cottage or wildflower garden, with large yellow flowers from June to September. This plant forms a rosette of leaves in the first year, and stems of flowers in the second season.  Flowers unfurl on the afternoon and evening when the scent is strongest.  Plants grow to a height of 50-150cm.  Bees love the flowers.  These are traditional medicinal plants.


Common Evening Primrose grows best in full sun to part shade and well-drained, poor to moderately fertile soil.  Plants self-seed in good conditions.

 

Pack of approx 1000 seeds.  Sow in autumn or spring/early summer.  Germination can be erratic, so sow more than you need.  Sowing instructions and a colour photo are printed on the packet.  

 

See how your seeds are packed.


Hardiness Hardy biennial (RHS Hardiness H7)
Flowers June to September
Height 50 - 150cm
Spread 10 - 50cm
Conditions  Sun to part shade and well-drained, poor to moderately fertile soil. 
Sow

Sow in autumn on the surface of a tray of seed compost and keep in a coldframe over winter. Seedlings emerge in spring.  Or sow in spring to early summer on the surface of a tray of seed compost.  Press the seeds lightly into the compost and keep at 18-20C during the day and naturally cool at night.  Germination takes 2-4 weeks.   If there is no germination, move the tray to a fridge for 4 weeks and back into the warmth. Transplant young seedlings into small pots and then outside into the ground or into containers, after hardening off.   

Grow

Plants form a rosette of leaves in the first season and flowers in the second season.   Remove plants after flowering has finished.  If you wish plants to self-seed, allow the seedheads to form after flowering and scatter the seed before clearing away.  Plants grow best in less exposed gardens.  Tip cuttings can be done in spring.  Plants form tap-roots, which can be eaten after flowering.